Blog

  • 19 Sep 2015 3:59 PM | Helen Mok (Administrator)

    Vicki Jay Leung
    Reference Librarian
    Paul Martin Law Library, University of Windsor

    Tell us a little about your educational background and how you entered the legal information industry.

    My foray into the legal information industry is unconventional – my undergraduate degree is a Bachelor of Science in Agriculture, from the University of Saskatchewan (yes, I am an Agro!).  I majored in Plant Ecology and minored in Soil Science and Agricultural Economics.  However, after working in research fields and greenhouses, I decided that it just wasn’t for me. 

    I came upon librarianship after researching possible professions that were more suited to my interests and skill sets.  I went to Western for my Master of Library and Information Science degree.  I was able to enter the co-op program and worked at the University of Windsor’s Paul Martin Law Library for eight months where I gained invaluable experience working in a specialized academic law library.

    After graduating, I found contract and part-time work while starting a family in Windsor, Ontario (my husband’s hometown).  It wasn’t until a few years later that I had the opportunity to join the Paul Martin Law Library again and work alongside current CALL President Annette Demers as a Reference Librarian.  In July 2014, I became tenured after 5 years of meeting my obligations as a librarian, proving that I am willing to take on responsibilities within and outside of the library.  I am very fortunate to find myself on a career path that is multi-faceted and rewarding.

    How has being involved in CALL helped you professionally?

    Belonging to CALL has not only allowed me to personally connect with colleagues from across Canada but has been a big part in shaping my professional identity.  Having that personal and professional link to an association has helped me to envision my role as an academic law librarian.  As one part academic librarian and one part legal researcher, I work with other specialty academic librarians who have different priorities and workloads than me in the law library - being a part of the CALL Academic Law Library Special Interest Group has facilitated in melding the two realities for me.

    The annual CALL Conference is the peak event anticipated by most members.  Not only do you get to meet friends and colleagues, but you also get the opportunity to learn the latest from vendor demos and hot topics in program sessions.  The conference is also a gathering place for peers to ask probing questions, share information, and learn from each other.

    My earlier involvement in CALL include: being a mentee in the mentorship program, where I had the great fortune of meeting Jeanne Maddix, Director of Bibliothèque de droit Michel-Bastarache at the Université de Moncton; being encouraged by my former boss, Paul Murphy, to contribute book reviews to the Canadian Law Library Review and working with book review editors Erica Anderson, Susan Barker, and Nancy McCormack; and helping out where needed by my current boss (and pro-CALL supporter), Annette Demers, for my first ever CALL Conference which was held in Windsor 2010, where I became the Volunteer Coordinator and was responsible for a Faculty of Windsor Law book display.

    I later joined the Membership Development Committee (chaired by Katherine Melville & Erica Anderson), the Committee to Promote Research (chaired by Marianne Rogers & Susan Barker), and am the current co-chair of the Academic Law Library SIG (working with Svetlana Kochkina and previously with Elizabeth Bruton).  With each role, be it promoting CALL to new members, helping to fund members pursuing their scholarship of legal information, or communicating ideas and issues within a special interest group, I find myself growing deeper roots in my efforts to become a better legal information specialist while also serving the needs of my association and colleagues.

    One thing I have to say is – don’t be afraid to volunteer, and please do not be afraid to say “yes” when you are called upon to help the association.  Not only will your service be appreciated but you will find it personally rewarding.  For example, I can be quite shy in large crowds, but I was able to put that aside when I was asked to moderate the 2013 conference plenary panel, Land of Confusion: E-Books’ License Negotiation Demystified, in Montreal.

    What’s one piece of advice you’d give to someone looking to break into the legal information industry?

    Like many others, as a youngster, I never aspired to become a librarian; however, I did have an affinity to libraries (even so far as creating little due date cards for my personal collection of storybooks at home!).  As a child growing up pre-internet and never owning a computer until I went to university (please do not guess how old I am), I found libraries invaluable sources of information and knowledge.

    If you like helping others, appreciate the organization of information, and enjoy variation in your job – then information management is for you!  If you like the law, especially the structure of how the law is organized, and enjoy working with people who have a vested interest in finding the law – then the legal information industry could definitely be for you!

    Keep in mind there are different kinds of law libraries (e.g. academic, courthouse, law firm, government, etc.), each with its own unique clientele and working environment.  For those interested in entering the legal information industry, I would suggest the following:

    1.    Make connections and talk with a legal information specialist or two to get an idea of what the job is like and whether a career in legal information is for you.

    2.    Look at different job ads to see what the requirements are.  Do you have the credentials? What kind of experience do you need to get? Do you find the list of duties interesting enough to pursue a career in legal information?

    3.    Look at where job ads are coming from and where jobs are being slashed.  Are you willing to relocate to where the jobs are? Remember, larger centres will have more job postings but will also have more competition for them whereas smaller centres will have fewer postings with less competition.  Also, keep in mind that publicly funded libraries*  may be phasing out some positions due to budget constraints.  These are some things to be aware of – so plan accordingly.

    *Governance and Funding of Libraries (school, public, academic) https://www.accessola.org/WEB/OLAWEB/Issues_Advocacy/Election_Resources/Governance_and_Funding_of_Libraries.aspx?WebsiteKey=397368c8-7910-4dfe-807f-9eeb1068be31&hkey=b3797b9f-3e43-46e9-a2e7-5202f1a6c19f

    What’s one change in the profession or industry that has been a challenge for you?

    The one challenge I see is how to reinvent oneself in response to changing user needs and declining budgets – in other words, how to do more with fewer resources.  As user preferences for online sources have increased, I have had to adapt what I teach students.  This includes promoting the credible and authoritative databases subscribed or linked to by the library and re-establishing the benefits of print resources as a learning tool to understand electronic resources as well as a complementary information source.  In tandem with considering user preferences, is the requirement to balance the needs of the user with what the library can actually afford to purchase for its print and electronic collection.  

    What are three things on your bucket list?

    Three things that I would like to accomplish in my career as an academic legal librarian:

    1.    Get published in a scholarly publication

    2.    Present by myself at a conference

    3.    Pursue a Master of Legal Studies degree

    Parlez-nous un peu de vos antécédents scolaires et de la manière dont vous vous êtes intégrée au secteur de l’information juridique.

    Mon expérience dans l’industrie de l’information juridique n’est pas classique – mon grade de premier cycle est un baccalauréat ès sciences en agriculture de l’Université de la Saskatchewan (oui, je viens du milieu agricole!). J’ai fait une majeure en écologie des plantes et une mineure en science des sols et en agroéconomie. Cependant, après avoir travaillé dans des champs de recherche et des serres, j’ai décidé que ce n’était pas pour moi. 

    J’ai découvert la bibliothéconomie après avoir cherché des professions possibles qui correspondaient davantage à mes intérêts et mes compétences. Je suis allée à l’Université Western pour obtenir une maîtrise en bibliothéconomie et en sciences de l’information. J’ai pu m’inscrire au programme d’enseignement coopératif et j’ai travaillé pendant huit mois à la bibliothèque de droit Paul Martin, ce qui m’a permis d’acquérir une expérience professionnelle inestimable au sein d’une bibliothèque de droit universitaire spécialisée.

    Après avoir obtenu mon diplôme, j’ai trouvé du travail contractuel et à temps partiel pendant que je fondais une famille à Windsor (Ontario) (la ville natale de mon mari). Ce n’est que quelques années plus tard que j’ai eu la possibilité de réintégrer la bibliothèque de droit Paul Martin et de travailler aux côtés de la présidente actuelle de l’ACBD/CALL, Annette Demers, à titre de bibliothécaire de référence. En juillet 2014, j’ai obtenu ma permanence après m’être acquittée de mes obligations en tant que bibliothécaire pendant cinq ans, prouvant ainsi que j’étais disposée à assumer des responsabilités au sein de la bibliothèque et à l’extérieur de celle-ci. J’ai beaucoup de chance de m’être engagée dans un cheminement de carrière à volets multiples et gratifiant.

    En quoi votre adhésion à l’ACBD/CALL vous a-t-elle été utile sur le plan professionnel?

    Mon adhésion à l’ACBD/CALL non seulement m’a permis de communiquer avec mes collègues de l’ensemble du Canada, mais a largement contribué à définir mon identité professionnelle. Ce lien personnel et professionnel avec une association m’a permis de visualiser mon rôle à titre de bibliothécaire de droit universitaire. En tant que bibliothécaire en milieu universitaire, d’une part, et recherchiste juridique, d’autre part, je collabore avec d’autres bibliothécaires universitaires spécialisés dont la charge de travail et les priorités sont différentes des miennes au sein de bibliothèques de droit; ma participation au groupe d’intérêts spéciaux (GIS) des bibliothèques de droit universitaires de l’ACBD/CALL a facilité l’intégration des deux réalités pour moi.

    La conférence annuelle de l’ACBD/CALL est l’événement culminant attendu par la plupart des membres. Non seulement cet événement nous offre-t-il l’occasion de rencontrer nos amis et nos collègues, mais il nous permet aussi de découvrir les derniers développements grâce aux démonstrations d’éditeurs et aux discussions portant sur des sujets chauds dans le cadre des séances de programmes. La conférence est également un lieu de rencontre où les pairs peuvent poser des questions d’approfondissement, échanger de l’information et apprendre les uns des autres.

    En ce qui concerne mon implication antérieure auprès de l’ACBD/CALL, j’ai été mentorée dans le cadre du programme de mentorat, et j’ai alors eu l’immense privilège de rencontrer Mme Jeanne Maddix, directrice de la Bibliothèque de droit Michel‑Bastarache de l’Université de Moncton; sous les encouragements de mon ancien patron, M. Paul Murphy, j’ai contribué à des comptes rendus de livres pour la Revue canadienne des bibliothèques de droit et collaboré avec les rédactrices chargées des comptes rendus de livres, Erica Anderson, Susan Barker et Nancy McCormack, et j’ai offert mon aide à la demande de ma patronne actuelle (et supportrice de l’ACBD/CALL), Mme Annette Demers, lors de ma toute première conférence de l’ACBD/CALL, tenue à Windsor en 2010, où je suis devenue coordonnatrice des bénévoles et responsable d’un présentoir de livres de la faculté de droit de Windsor.

    Je me suis ensuite jointe au Comité du recrutement des membres (présidé par Katherine Melville et Erica Anderson) et au Comité pour promouvoir la recherche (présidé par Marianne Rogers et Susan Barker), et je copréside actuellement le GIS des bibliothèques de droit universitaires (en collaboration avec Svetlana Kochkina et, auparavant, avec Elizabeth Bruton). Dans l’exercice de chacun de mes rôles, qu’il s’agisse de promouvoir l’ACBD/CALL auprès des nouveaux membres, d’aider à assurer le financement destiné aux membres titulaires d’une bourse d’études en information juridique ou de communiquer des idées et des enjeux au sein d’un groupe d’intérêts spéciaux, je consolide mes racines dans le cadre de mes efforts pour devenir une meilleure spécialiste de l’information juridique, tout en répondant aux besoins de mon association et de mes collègues.

    Je tiens à dire une chose : n’ayez pas peur de collaborer à titre bénévole et de répondre « oui » lorsqu’on vous demande d’aider l’association. Non seulement vos services seront‑ils appréciés, mais en outre, vous trouverez cela valorisant sur le plan personnel. Par exemple, je suis parfois très timide au sein de grands groupes, mais j’ai réussi à laisser ma timidité de côté lorsqu’on m’a demandé de modérer une discussion en séance plénière intitulée Un monde de confusion : démystifier le processus de négociation des licences pour les livres numériques dans le cadre de la conférence de 2013, à Montréal.

    Quel conseil offririez-vous à une personne qui cherche à percer dans le secteur de l’information juridique?

    Comme bien des gens, quand j’étais jeune, je n’ai jamais eu l’ambition de devenir bibliothécaire; cependant, j’avais une affinité avec les bibliothèques (je fabriquais même de petites cartes indiquant la date limite pour ma collection personnelle de livres d’histoires à la maison!). J’ai grandi avant l’émergence d’Internet, et comme je n’ai eu mon propre ordinateur qu’une fois arrivée à l’université (n’essayez pas de deviner mon âge, je vous prieJ), je considérais les bibliothèques comme des sources inestimables d’information et de connaissances.

    Si vous aimez aider les autres, si vous appréciez l’organisation de l’information et si le travail diversifié vous plaît, la gestion de l’information vous convient parfaitement! Si vous aimez le droit, particulièrement la manière dont la loi est organisée, et si vous aimez travailler avec des personnes qui sont intéressées à trouver les lois, l’industrie de l’information juridique pourrait sûrement vous convenir!

    N’oubliez pas qu’il existe divers types de bibliothèques de droit (p. ex. universités, palais de justice, cabinets d’avocats, gouvernements, etc.), dont chacun possède sa clientèle particulière et son propre environnement de travail. Voici les conseils que j’offrirais aux personnes intéressées par le secteur de l’information juridique :

    1.    Communiquez et discutez avec un ou deux spécialistes de l’information juridique afin d’avoir une idée du type de travail et de savoir si une carrière dans ce domaine vous convient.

    2.    Examinez diverses offres d’emploi afin de connaître les exigences. Possédez‑vous les titres de compétence nécessaires? Quel type d’expérience devez-vous acquérir? Trouvez-vous la liste des tâches suffisamment intéressante pour entreprendre une carrière dans le domaine de l’information juridique.

    3.    Examinez la provenance des offres d’emploi et les endroits où des postes sont supprimés. Êtes-vous disposés à vous déplacer vers les lieux où les emplois se trouvent? Rappelez-vous que les avis de postes vacants sont plus nombreux dans les grands centres mais que la concurrence y est aussi plus forte, tandis que les centres plus petits comptent moins de postes à pourvoir, mais moins de concurrence. De plus, n’oubliez pas que les bibliothèques financées par l’État* peuvent éliminer progressivement des postes en raison de contraintes budgétaires. Ce sont là des aspects dont vous devez être conscients; ainsi, planifiez en conséquence.

    *Governance and Funding of Libraries (school, public, academic) (en anglais) https://www.accessola.org/WEB/OLAWEB/Issues_Advocacy/Election_Resources/Governance_and_Funding_of_Libraries.aspx?WebsiteKey=397368c8-7910-4dfe-807f-9eeb1068be31&hkey=b3797b9f-3e43-46e9-a2e7-5202f1a6c19f

    Y a-t-il un changement relatif à la profession ou à l’industrie qui a présenté un défi pour vous?

    Le défi qui se pose, selon moi, est lié à la manière de se réinventer compte tenu des besoins changeants des utilisateurs et de la réduction des budgets; autrement dit, comment faire plus avec des ressources réduites. À mesure que la préférence des utilisateurs pour les ressources en ligne s’est renforcée, j’ai dû adapter ce que j’enseignais aux étudiants. Cela comprend la promotion des bases de données fiables et faisant autorité utilisées par la bibliothèque ou auxquelles celle-ci est abonnée et le rétablissement des avantages des ressources imprimées en guise d’outil d’apprentissage qui permet de comprendre les ressources électroniques, de même qu’une source d’information complémentaire. En plus de tenir compte des préférences des utilisateurs, il faut établir un équilibre entre les besoins de ces derniers et les achats que la bibliothèque peut se permettre pour ses collections imprimées et électroniques. 

    Indiquez trois choses qui figurent dans votre liste du cœur?

    J’aimerais accomplir trois choses dans le cadre de ma carrière à titre de bibliothécaire de droit en milieu universitaire :

    1.    Voir un de mes articles publié dans une publication érudite;

    2.    Faire une présentation dans le cadre d’une conférence;

    3.    Entreprendre un programme de maîtrise en études juridiques.

  • 18 Sep 2015 4:03 PM | Michel-Adrien Sheppard (Administrator)

    Le texte français suit. 

    The Canadian Bar Association has produced an Election Engagement Kit that will "put equal access to justice on candidates’ radar and publicly call for enhanced federal leadership in this area".

    The Kit includes tips for Bar Association members and anyone else interested in the issue on how to:

    • Ask questions when candidates come knocking on your door.
    • Attend and raise these issues at all candidates’ meetings.
    • Contribute to the online debate and tweet about it by using the hashtag #whataboutalex.

    [Michel-Adrien Sheppard]

    L'Association du Barreau canadien a publié une trousse de participation électorale qui vise à faire en sorte que « l’accès à la justice devienne une réelle préoccupation politique et exiger un renforcement du leadership federal ».

    La trousse contient des conseils utiles aux membres du Barreau ou à toute autre personne intéressée par la question pour savoir comment:

    • poser des questions aux candidats lorsqu’ils viennent frapper à votre porte;
    • assister aux débats entre tous les candidats et posez des questions; et,
    • contribuer au débat en ligne sur Twitter au moyen du mot-clic #etpouralex.

    [Michel-Adrien Sheppard]

  • 25 Aug 2015 11:33 AM | Helen Mok (Administrator)

    Maryvon Côté

    Maryvon Côté

    Assistant Head, Liaison Librarian, and Building Director

    Nahum Gelber Law Library, McGill University

    Tell us a little about your educational background and how you entered the legal information industry.

    In addition to a Master of Library and Information Studies degree from McGill University, I obtained a Bachelor of Arts degree in History at the University of Ottawa. I wanted to understand the highlights of Canadian and European history and the history of the 20th century which, with law, defined the society in which we live today. This training in history, with an interdisciplinary approach, often gave me the opportunity to work in the library with secondary and primary sources, such as legislative texts. This experience was fundamental for me as a librarian in the academic community in teaching students Canadian, American, French and International Law.

    How has being involved in CALL helped you professionally?

    My involvement in ACBD/CALL initially allowed me to meet and share my experiences with excellent colleagues who share my passion for law librarianship across Canada.  This also opened my eyes to the profession of librarian in other professional settings, which allows me to have a more diversified and more complete approach when new challenges arise.

    What was your first job or your first library-related job?

    Before working as a full-time librarian at McGill, I held several student jobs at the Morisset Library of the University of Ottawa, particularly in the media library during my university studies. Subsequently, I worked part-time as a library loan clerk at the Ottawa Public Library, while working at City of Ottawa Customer Service. After my first year in the Master’s program, I obtained a summer job at the Statistics Canada Library and a student job at the reference counter of the Humanities and Social Sciences Library (McLennan Library) of McGill University.  I thus acquired strong competencies in customer relations that I still find very useful today.

    What’s one change in the profession or industry you’ve embraced?

    When I started working in a library, information was available mainly in print, on CD-ROM, and online on a library server. Today, information is online everywhere on a wide range of different media. The challenge is to keep abreast of new approaches we can adopt to do research, while mastering the traditional sources, which are still faithful.

    What are three skills/attributes you think legal information professionals need to have?

    Rigour

    Open-mindedness

    Interest in technological progress

    Parlez-nous un peu de vos antécédents scolaires et de la manière dont vous vous êtes intégré au secteur de l’information juridique.

    En plus de la maitrise en bibliothéconomie et sciences de l’information de l’Université McGill, j’ai complété un baccalauréat ès art en histoire à l’Université d’Ottawa.  J’ai voulu comprendre les grands moments de l’histoire Canadienne et Européenne ainsi que l’histoire du XXe siècle qui ont, avec le droit, défini la société dans laquelle nous vivons aujourd’hui.  Cette formation en histoire avec une approche interdisciplinaire m’a permis de travailler souvent dans la bibliothèque avec des ressources  secondaires et primaires telles que les textes législatifs.  Cette expérience m’a été fondamentale en tant que bibliothécaire dans le milieu académique pour donner des formations aux étudiants en droit Canadien, Américain, Français et en Droit International.  

    En quoi votre adhésion à l’ACBD/CALL vous a-t-elle été utile sur le plan professionnel?

    Mon adhésion à l’ACBD/CALL m’a permis dans un premier temps de rencontrer et de partager mes expériences avec d’excellents collègues qui ont la même passion que moi de la bibliothéconomie juridique à travers le Canada.  Cela m’a aussi ouvert les yeux sur la profession de bibliothécaire dans d’autres milieux professionnels ce qui me permet d’avoir une approche plus diversifiée et plus complète lorsque surgissent de nouveaux défis. 

    Quel a été votre premier emploi, ou votre premier emploi dans le domaine de la bibliothéconomie?

    Avant de travailler comme bibliothécaire à McGill à temps pleins, j’ai occupé plusieurs emplois-étudiants la bibliothèque Morisset de l’Université d’Ottawa notamment à la médiathèque lors de mes études universitaires.  Par la suite, j’ai travaillé à temps partiel comme préposé au prêt à la bibliothèque publique de la ville d’Ottawa tout en travaillant au Service à la Clientèle de la Ville d’Ottawa.  Après ma première années à la maitrise, j’ai obtenu un emploi d’été à la bibliothèque de Statistique Canada et un emplois-étudiant au comptoir de la référence de la bibliothèque des Sciences Humaines et Sociales (McLennan) de l’Université McGill.  J’ai ainsi acquis de solides compétences en matière de relations avec la clientèle qui me soit encore fort utiles aujourd’hui.

    Y a-t-il un changement relatif à la profession ou à l’industrie auquel vous vous êtes adapté?

    Lorsque j’ai commencé à travailler dans une bibliothèque, l’information était  disponible notamment en format imprimé, en CD-Rom ou en ligne sur un serveur de la bibliothèque.  Aujourd’hui, l’information est partout en ligne via de nouveaux supports aussi différents les uns que les autres.  Le défi est de rester à l’affut des nouvelles approches que nous pouvons adopter pour faire de la recherche tout en maitrisant les sources traditionnelles qui sont toujours fidèles.

    Quelles sont les trois compétences ou qualités que doivent posséder les professionnels de l’information juridique, selon vous?

    Rigueur

    Ouverture d’esprit

    Intérêt pour les évolutions technologiques

  • 17 Jul 2015 3:24 PM | Helen Mok (Administrator)

    Jennifer Walker
    Head Librarian, County of Carleton Law Association

    Tell us a little about your educational background and how you entered the legal information industry.

    I entered the legal information profession directly out of grad school, which I completed at Dalhousie’s School of Information Management. In my last semester, there was a course on legal librarianship taught by the then-Head of the Law Library, Ann Morrison. I thought she was just wonderful, and she made legal librarianship sound like a pretty great job! I definitely liked the research element and had already been more interested in special libraries. I am very fortunate that an entry-level reference librarian and cataloguing job opened up at my organization just as I was graduating.  I’ve been happy to be here, and to take on increased responsibility, for over 7 years now. Prior to all that, I did my undergraduate degree in history (I really do love research), as well as a Bachelor of Education with an emphasis in teaching high school students. While high school can be a lot of fun, I am very happy I made the decision to pursue librarianship instead.

    How has being involved in CALL helped you professionally?

    CALL has been incredibly beneficial to me as a librarian. Starting in law libraries directly out of school, there was a lot to learn and a whole new world of colleagues to meet. I very quickly became involved with CALL and have learned so much from the educational opportunities I’ve had at the conferences, through my NELI grant in 2010, and from truly welcoming, kind, and smart colleagues. This is a profession where having someone to contact for help or to bounce ideas off of is of immense benefit, and CALL has enabled me to make those connections and build a solid network of other legal information professionals.

    What are three things on your bucket list?

    I absolutely love to travel, so my mind immediately goes to the places I’d like to visit and things to see & do there. I would love to visit Oxford, England and see both the city and the University. You can only watch so many hours of Inspector Morse without actually going there, and I believe I’m at my limit! I would also love to visit Istanbul. There is so much that would be wonderful to take in there, such as the Grand Bazaar, and visiting Hagia Sofia and the Blue Mosque. Closer to home, I would absolutely love to visit Vancouver, and experience that West coast culture we hear so much about in Ontario.  It seems like I might be getting my wish on that for CALL 2016!

    What’s one change in the profession or industry you’ve embraced?

    I don’t believe it’s so much a change in the industry but certainly in my role and my organization, and that is an increased responsibility for providing legal research instruction. I come from an education background, but I never thought I would draw on that skill set as much as I have in the last three years of being a librarian. It’s exciting for me to lead training sessions, and I think providing these sessions to our clients presents real value for our library and demonstrates what we can do beyond simply being there to answer questions.

    What was your first job or your first library-related job?

    My first library-related jobs were all student jobs in various archives or records departments. My first actual job, however, was when I was 15, at a movie theatre. That job taught me an incredible amount about customer service and really formed my ethic for working with clients which I still believe in today. Fortunately, my job doesn’t currently involve standing in front of a cinema full of people asking them to turn off their pagers and phones, though that perhaps foreshadowed the more “Shhh!” side of librarianship!

    Parlez-nous un peu de vos antécédents scolaires et de la manière dont vous vous êtes intégrée au secteur de l’information juridique.

    Je suis entrée dans la profession de l’information juridique dès la fin de mes études supérieures, que j’ai effectuées à l’École de gestion de l’information de Dalhousie. Pendant mon dernier semestre, on offrait un cours de bibliothéconomie juridique qui était enseigné par la directrice de la bibliothèque de droit de l’époque, Ann Morrison. Je la trouvais absolument fantastique, car elle nous présentait la bibliothéconomie juridique comme un travail très intéressant! J’aimais résolument l’élément de recherche, et je m’étais déjà intéressée davantage aux bibliothèques spécialisées. J’ai eu beaucoup de chance, puisqu’un poste de bibliothécaire de référence et de catalogage de premier échelon s’est ouvert au sein de mon organisation à la fin de mes études. Je suis très heureuse ici depuis plus de sept ans maintenant, et je suis ravie d’assumer des responsabilités accrues. Auparavant, j’ai effectué des études de premier cycle en histoire (j’aime vraiment la recherche), et j’ai obtenu un baccalauréat en éducation, avec un intérêt particulier pour l’enseignement auprès des élèves du secondaire. Bien que l’enseignement au secondaire puisse être très agréable, je suis très heureuse d’avoir pris la décision de me diriger plutôt vers la bibliothéconomie.

    En quoi votre adhésion à l’ACBD/CALL vous a-t-elle été utile sur le plan professionnel?

    L’ACBD/CALL a été incroyablement utile pour moi, en tant que bibliothécaire. Comme j’ai commencé dans les bibliothèques de droit directement après mes études, j’avais beaucoup à apprendre et un tout nouveau groupe de collègues à rencontrer. J’ai très rapidement participé aux activités de l’ACBD/CALL, et j’ai appris beaucoup grâce aux possibilités éducatives qui m’ont été offertes dans le cadre des congrès, grâce à ma subvention du NELI en 2010 et auprès de collègues vraiment chaleureux, sympathiques et intelligents. La bibliothéconomie est une profession où le fait d’avoir une personne à qui demander de l’aide ou soumettre des idées représente un avantage énorme, et l’ACBD/CALL m’a permis d’établir ce type de liens et de me bâtir un réseau solide avec d’autres professionnels de l’information juridique.

    Indiquez trois choses qui figurent dans votre liste du cœur.

    J’adore voyager; mon esprit se rend donc immédiatement dans les lieux que j’aimerais visiter, et découvre les choses à voir et à faire dans ces endroits. J’aimerais visiter Oxford, en Angleterre, et voir la ville et l’université. Il y a une limite au nombre d’épisodes d’Inspecteur Morse qu’on peut visionner sans s’y rendre en personne, et je crois que j’ai atteint la mienne! J’aimerais également visiter Istanbul. Il y a tellement de découvertes magnifiques à faire là-bas, comme le Grand Bazar, la basilique Sainte‑Sophie et la Mosquée bleue. Plus près d’ici, j’adorerais voir Vancouver, et découvrir la culture de la côte ouest dont nous entendons beaucoup parler en Ontario. Je pourrai peut-être réaliser mon souhait lors du congrès 2016 de l’ACBD/CALL!

    Y a-t-il un changement relatif à la profession ou à l’industrie auquel vous vous êtes adaptée?

    Je ne crois pas qu’il s’agisse tellement d’un changement relatif à l’industrie, mais plutôt d’un changement lié à mon rôle et à mon organisation, c’est-à-dire une responsabilité accrue concernant l’enseignement en matière de recherche juridique. Je viens du milieu de l’enseignement, mais je n’aurais jamais cru me servir autant de cet ensemble de compétences au cours des trois dernières années dans le cadre de mes fonctions de bibliothécaire. C’est passionnant pour moi de diriger des séances de formation, et je crois que le fait d’offrir ces séances à nos clients représente une valeur réelle pour notre bibliothèque et montre ce que nous pouvons faire au-delà de simplement être là pour répondre aux questions.

    Quel a été votre premier emploi, ou votre premier emploi dans le domaine de la bibliothéconomie?

    Mes premiers emplois liés à la bibliothéconomie étaient tous des emplois pour étudiants au sein de divers services d’archives ou de dossiers. Cependant, mon premier emploi réel était dans un cinéma lorsque j’avais 15 ans. Ce poste m’a énormément appris au sujet du service à la clientèle et a vraiment formé mon éthique de travail avec les clients, à laquelle je crois encore aujourd’hui. Heureusement, mon emploi actuel ne m’oblige pas à me tenir debout devant une salle de cinéma remplie de gens pour leur demander d’éteindre leurs téléavertisseurs et leurs téléphones, même si cet aspect laissait peut‑être entrevoir le côté plus « Chuuuut » de la bibliothéconomie!

     

  • 16 Jul 2015 2:20 PM | Michel-Adrien Sheppard (Administrator)

    Le texte français suit.

    University of Windsor law librarian and former CALL President Annette Demers  wrote last week on Slaw.ca about a new custom search engine for finding open source law journals from Canada, the US and Europe.

    The search engine covers the following collections:

    • BePress Law Commons Network
    • BePress Law School Institutional Repositories
    • Centre d’accès a l’information juridique (CAIJ)
    • Cornell Law School Working Papers Series
    • Dalhousie Journal of Legal Studies
    • Directory of Open Access Journals - Law
    • Duke Law Scholarship Repository
    • European Integration Online Papers
    • European Journal of International Law
    • European Research Papers Archive
    • International Review of the Red Cross
    • JurisBistro
    • Law Review Commons
    • Manitoba Law Journal
    • McGill Law Journal/Revue de droit de McGill
    • New England Law Library Consortium (NELLCO) Legal Scholarship Repository, including Harvard (DASH), Columbia (Academic Commons) and New York University (Faculty Digital Archive)
    • Osgoode Digital Commons
    • Ottawa Law Review/Revue de droit d’Ottawa
    • Queen’s Law Journal (current issue embargoed)
    • Revue du Barreau
    • Revue de droit de l’Université de Sherbrooke (RDUS)
    • University of Alberta’s Constitutional Forum and Review of Constitutional Studies
    • Western University’s Journal of Legal Studies
    • Windsor Yearbook of Access to Justice
    • WorldLII - International Legal Scholarship Library 

    Demers had already created the following custom search engines at her library:

    [Michel-Adrien Sheppard]

    Dans un article publié la semaine dernière sur le site Slaw.ca, Annette Demers, bibliothécaire de droit à l'Université de Windsor et ancienne president de l'ACBD, a décrit un nouveau moteur de recherche créé sur mesure pour chercher dans les revues de droit en libre accès du Canada, des États-Unis et de l'Europe.

     Le moteur indexe le contenu des collections suivantes:

    • BePress Law Commons Network
    • BePress Law School Institutional Repositories
    • Centre d’accès a l’information juridique (CAIJ)
    • Cornell Law School Working Papers Series
    • Dalhousie Journal of Legal Studies
    • Directory of Open Access Journals - Law
    • Duke Law Scholarship Repository
    • European Integration Online Papers
    • European Journal of International Law
    • European Research Papers Archive
    • International Review of the Red Cross
    • JurisBistro
    • Law Review Commons
    • Manitoba Law Journal
    • McGill Law Journal/Revue de droit de McGill
    • New England Law Library Consortium (NELLCO) Legal Scholarship Repository, y compris les collections de Harvard (DASH), de Columbia (Academic Commons) et de la New York University (Faculty Digital Archive)
    • Osgoode Digital Commons
    • Ottawa Law Review/Revue de droit d’Ottawa
    • Queen’s Law Journal
    • Revue du Barreau
    • Revue de droit de l’Université de Sherbrooke (RDUS)
    • University of Alberta’s Constitutional Forum and Review of Constitutional Studies
    • Western University’s Journal of Legal Studies
    • Windsor Yearbook of Access to Justice
    • WorldLII - International Legal Scholarship Library 

    Demers avait déjà lancé les moteurs de recherche spécialisés suivants à sa bibliothèque:

    [Michel-Adrien Sheppard]

  • 19 Jun 2015 11:28 AM | Helen Mok (Administrator)

    John Kerr
    Librarian, Wellington Law Association

    Tell us a little about your educational background and how you entered the legal information industry.

    I am a graduate of the University of Toronto (Erindale College). After a brief stint in industry, I enrolled in the Sheridan College LT program.

    There was an opening at the local county courthouse library and I applied and was hired. Before that, I had worked in a special library based at the University of Guelph and the University of Guelph Library.

    How has being involved in CALL helped you professionally?

    Attending the annual conference recharges me, and I learn a few things too.

    What’s your greatest work or career-related challenge?

    So much software, so little time.

    What’s one blog, website, or Twitter account that you can’t go one day without checking?

    I have lots of Linux friends on Google+ so I am always checking that. Slaw is high on my list as well. It can also depend on what I am up to at the moment. Right now, I am hitting every website I can that has information about the LaTeX document creation software. LaTeX (pronounced Laytek) is the great grand-daddy of desktop publishing. I believe that in the near future law librarians (working with the bar) will become publishers. LaTeX is the foundation on which most academic publishing is based. I am sure that many legal publishers use LaTeX or a derivative. It is free software too, anyone can download it.

    What are three things on your bucket list?

    • Visit Ireland.
    • Climb to the top of the Brock Monument.
    • Walk across the famous Abbey Road crossing in London.

    Parlez-nous un peu de vos antécédents scolaires et de la manière dont vous vous êtes intégré au secteur de l’information juridique.

    Je suis diplômé de l’Université de Toronto (Collège Erindale). Après un bref passage au sein de l’industrie, je me suis inscrit au programme de bibliotechnique du Collège Sheridan.

    Il y avait un poste vacant à la bibliothèque du palais de justice du comté local; j’ai posé ma candidature et j’ai été embauché. Auparavant, j’avais travaillé dans une bibliothèque spéciale établie au sein de l’Université de Guelph et à la bibliothèque de l’Université de Guelph.

    En quoi votre adhésion à l’ACBD/CALL vous a-t-elle été utile sur le plan professionnel?

    La participation à la conférence annuelle me permet de recharger mes batteries, et aussi d’apprendre certaines choses.

    Quel est votre plus grand défi lié à votre travail ou votre carrière?

    Il y a tellement de logiciels, et si peu de temps.

    Y a-t-il un blogue, un site Web ou un compte Twitter que vous ne pouvez pas négliger de consulter tous les jours?

    J’ai de nombreux amis Linux sur Google+, donc je vérifie toujours ma page. Slaw figure aussi au sommet de ma liste. Cela peut également dépendre de ce que je fais à un moment donné. À l’heure actuelle, je consulte tous les sites Web possibles qui contiennent de l’information au sujet du logiciel de création de documents LaTeX. LaTeX (on prononce Laytek) est l’arrière-grand-père de l’éditique. Je crois que dans un avenir proche, les bibliothécaires de droit (en collaboration avec le barreau) deviendront des éditeurs. LaTeX est la base sur laquelle s’appuie l’essentiel de l’édition universitaire. Je suis convaincu que de nombreux éditeurs juridiques utilisent LaTeX ou un programme dérivé. C’est également un logiciel gratuit; tout le monde peut le télécharger.

    Indiquez trois choses qui figurent dans votre liste du cœur?

    • Visiter l’Irlande.
    • Monter au sommet du monument Brock.
    • Traverser la célèbre intersection d’Abbey Road à Londres.


  • 10 Jun 2015 10:24 AM | Nicole Cork (Administrator)

    It was very exciting to see Daniel Poulin’s Slaw post on the recent Canadian Law Library Review article “Charting Law’s Cosmos: Toward a Crowdsourced Citator” by Mark Phillips, ((2015) 40:2 Can L Libr Rev 13).

    To quote Daniel about reading the article, “Immerging oneself in it is like being 40 again: abundant critics of the slow moving incumbents, strong expressions of idealism peppered with some good ideas. Such a reading is good for the heart and the brain.”

    Read his SLAW post “Enfin. a Good Paper in the Canadian Law Library Review!” and then don’t forget to read the article itself, you won’t be disappointed.

    As he notes the title of his post is deliberately provocative.  As editor, I can confirm that w­­e have had many good papers in the CLLR. Rex Shoyama’s recent award winning feature article ((2014) 39:2 Can L LIbr Rev 11) “Citations to Wikipedia in Canadian Law Journal and Law Review Articles” is a case in point.  Rex’s article was mentioned in The Wikimedia Research Newsletter  and was also discussed in the Cleveland-Marshall College of Law's Library Blog.

    Susan Barker
    Editor
    Canadian Law Library Review


  • 04 Jun 2015 4:31 PM | Michel-Adrien Sheppard (Administrator)

    Le texte français suit. 

    Earlier this week, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission released its findings after its multi-year investigation into over a century of physical and sexual abuses against Aboriginal children at Church-run Indian Residential Schools.

    The Government Library & IM Professionals Network, part of the Canadian Library Association, has compiled the Commission's many calls to action that focus on the information management community (museums, Library and Archives Canada, archivist associations, vital statistics agencies, etc.).

    In addition, Library and Archives Canada has compiled a list of resources relating to residential school records.

    [Michel-Adrien Sheppard]

    Plus tôt cette semaine, la Commission de vérité et reconciliation du Canada a publié les conclusions de son enquête de plusieurs années sur les nombreux abus physiques et sexuels subis pendant plus d'un siècle par les enfants autochtones envoyés dans les pensionnats indiens.

    La Commission a publié de nombreux appels à l'action qui s'adressent en particulier aux bibliothèques et à la communauté de la gestion de l'information [en anglais] (musées, Bibliothèque et Archives Canada, associations d'archivistes, bureaux d'état civil, etc.). Ce sont les articles 67 à 78 dans ce document en français.

    De plus, Bibliothèque et Archives Canada a publié une liste de Ressources pour la recherche des pensionnats autochtones.

    [Michel-Adrien Sheppard] 

  • 02 Jun 2015 11:17 AM | Nicole Cork (Administrator)

    Click here to view this month's In Session Newsletter!

  • 21 May 2015 10:48 AM | Nicole Cork (Administrator)



    Mark Lewis

    Reference/IT Librarian
    Sir James Dunn Law Library, Dalhousie University


    Tell us a little about your educational background and how you entered the legal information industry.

    I obtained my BA (Honours) Political Science & History from the University of New Brunswick.   Prior to finishing that degree, I was an exchange student at Bilkent University in Ankara, Turkey  (one of the best experiences of my life).  I obtained my MLIS from Dalhousie University and, later, a Graduate Diploma in Public Administration as well.  Sometime in the mix there, I started down the road of studying near and Middle Eastern civilizations but veered from there to the MLIS.  

    My interest in the legal information industry came from work I did with the New Brunswick Legislative Library as a student and post-MLIS. When it came time to look for permanent work, I was looking for a gov docs/legal information type of position.  After some months and a couple of short-term contracts, I was lucky enough to get two offers at once (when it rains it pours), one to go stateside and one here in Canada.  By virtue of this being the Canadian Association of Law Libraries, you can guess which path I took.

     

    How has being involved in CALL helped you professionally?

    It has helped me tremendously, from being sponsored for the Northern Exposure to Leadership Institute, to scholarship assistance to further my education, to access to continuing professional development, as well as the ability to consult with a vast network of colleagues.  I cannot imagine my career without the assistance of CALL.   Now that I am mid-career, I hope to be able to give back a bit while also continuing to take advantage of further opportunities that arise to enhance my career through CALL/ACBD. 

    Who is your favourite library professional—living or dead, real or fictional?

    Maester Aemon.  He could have been king but made the considered decision to remain an information professional!

    What is one thing that’s surprised you about the legal information profession?

    The ongoing development of the profession and the need to "keep up" never stops.  Many people, upon learning that you work in a library, say something to the effect that it must be a nice, "calm" existence.  I've found it to be quite the opposite.  In this day and age, the landscape is constantly shifting and staying on top of those developments is a daily challenge. 

    What’s one piece of advice you’d give to someone looking to break into the legal information industry?

    If being in the legal information industry is your goal, don't limit yourself by geography. Watch for the dominoes to fall.  There may be a stretch with few opportunities but then one person will move to another position and a domino effect will start—watch for it.  One piece of advice to anyone looking for work in the industry is not to be afraid of taking a contract to build up experience and contacts.  Lastly, don't limit yourself by the traditional notion of a librarian. I prefer to think of us as information ninjas. Look for a legal information ninja position, and don't be afraid to point out to management types that what they really need is someone with the skill set that you happen to possess.

    Parlez-nous un peu de vos antécédents scolaires et de la manière dont vous vous êtes intégré au secteur de l’information juridique.

    J’ai obtenu un B.A. (avec distinction) en science politique et histoire de l’Université du Nouveau-Brunswick. Avant d’obtenir ce diplôme, j’ai participé à un programme d’échanges d’étudiants à l’Université Bilkent à Ankara, en Turquie (l’une des meilleures expériences de ma vie). J’ai obtenu une MBSI de l’Université de Dalhousie puis, plus tard, un diplôme d’études supérieures en administration publique. Quelque part dans tout cela, j’ai commencé à étudier les civilisations du Proche-Orient et du Moyen‑Orient, mais je me suis plutôt dirigé vers la MBSI.  

    Mon intérêt pour le secteur de l’information juridique découle du travail que j’ai effectué à la bibliothèque de l’Assemblée législative du Nouveau-Brunswick, pendant mes études et après l’obtention de ma MBSI. Lorsqu’est venu le temps de chercher un emploi permanent, je recherchais un poste dans le domaine des documents gouvernementaux et de l’information juridique. Après quelques mois et deux ou trois contrats de courte durée, j’ai eu la chance de recevoir deux offres en même temps (un bonheur ne vient jamais seul), l’une aux États-Unis et l’autre ici, au Canada. Comme il s’agit de l’Association canadienne des bibliothèques de droit, vous pouvez deviner quel chemin j’ai pris.

    En quoi votre adhésion à l’ACBD/CALL vous a-t-elle été utile sur le plan professionnel?

    Elle m’a énormément aidé, de mon parrainage auprès du Northern Exposure to Leadership Institute à la bourse qui m’a été octroyée pour poursuivre mes études, en passant par l’accès à des possibilités de perfectionnement professionnel continu et la capacité de consulter un vaste réseau de collègues. Je ne saurais concevoir ma carrière sans l’aide de l’ACBD/CALL. Maintenant que j’en suis au milieu de ma carrière, j’espère pouvoir remettre un peu de ce que j’ai reçu, tout en continuant de tirer profit d’autres possibilités d’enrichir mon parcours professionnel grâce à l’ACBD/CALL. 

    Qui est votre professionnel de la bibliothéconomie favori, vivant ou décédé, réel ou fictif?

    Maester Aemon. Il aurait pu être roi, mais il a pris la décision réfléchie de demeurer un professionnel de l’information!

    Quel est l’aspect de la profession de l’information juridique qui vous a étonné?

    L’évolution continue de la profession et la nécessité de « suivre le rythme » ne s’arrêtent jamais. Bien des gens, lorsqu’ils apprennent que vous travaillez dans une bibliothèque, croient qu’il doit s’agir d’une existence agréable et « paisible ». J’ai constaté qu’il en est tout autrement. De nos jours, le paysage évolue constamment, et suivre le rythme de cette évolution constitue un défi quotidien. 

    Quel conseil offririez-vous à une personne qui cherche à percer dans le secteur de l’information juridique?

    Si votre objectif est de faire partie du secteur de l’information juridique, ne vous imposez pas de limites géographiques. Regardez les dominos tomber. Il peut y avoir une période où les possibilités sont rares, mais ensuite une personne se déplace vers un autre poste, ce qui déclenche une réaction en chaîne—soyez à l’affût. Je conseille aux personnes qui cherchent du travail dans le secteur de ne pas avoir peur d’accepter un contrat afin d’acquérir de l’expérience et de nouer des liens. Enfin, ne vous limitez pas à la notion traditionnelle concernant les bibliothécaires; je préfère nous considérer comme des « ninjas » de l’information. Cherchez un poste de « ninja » de l’information juridique, et ne craignez pas de signaler aux gens du domaine de la gestion qu’ils ont réellement besoin de quelqu’un


Please send comments or questions to office@callacbd.ca - © 1998-2015 Canadian Association of Law Libraries
200-411 Richmond Street East, Toronto, ON     M5A 3S5   647-346-8723
This website is best viewied in Firefox or Google Chrome.
Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software